The Power of “Can’t”.

Sooner or later, most of us who try to cope with depression feel so overwhelmed that all we can hold onto is: I just can’t do it. I can’t stop being depressed. I can’t stop it from coming back.

When “I can’t” comes rushing out, it feel like the response to an accusation. Sometimes, I feel the weight of other people’s expectations. “If you really wanted to get well, you could at least get up and get moving.” Sure, they don’t understand, they don’t get it. But I’m asking the same question of myself.

I’m answering my own accusation. “So why can’t you handle this? You’re a completely worthless weakling!” “But I just can’t!” is my only answer. I’ve internalized the stigma and prejudice and feebly try to respond. I don’t trust myself. What if I am faking this? What if I’m just afraid to face things? I know that isn’t true, but there’s the inner belief that I ought to be able to snap out of depression. But there’s nothing left to fight with. Everything deserts me: vitality, willpower, feelings, the ability to think clearly about getting well, to make choices, to take action. The inner drive to get well is replaced by the depressive drive to get worse or simply stagnate.

When I’m trying to cope in that condition, all I can do is to start where I am. Since I can’t do anything, just where would that starting point be? Depression gifts you with extraordinarily vivid, powerful, detailed memories of all your mistakes, failures, weaknesses, embarrassments. You have absolute clarity of mind for the negatives, and they build a case of shame and worthlessness. Severe depression, after all, really wants to destroy you, literally if possible. So it leaves you the mental and emotional equipment to undermine your life.

That’s what I’m obsessed with. At the same time, though, I’m aware that I’m tearing myself down. I see what I’m doing to myself, and another level of awareness opens up. I want to stop the depression. I really want to feel better. I may not be able to do much to end it, but I know I want to come alive again.

Visualize Time

“Be soft. Do not let the world make you hard. Do not let pain make
you hate. Do not let the bitterness steal your sweetness. Take
pride that even though the rest of the world may disagree, you still
believe it to be a beautiful place.” ~Iain Thomas

Comparing my past to my present is something I’ve been doing a lot lately, I wouldn’t recommend doing it for too long though. It’s like trying to get to the next page, chapter, or even series of a book, but you can’t due to consistently flipping pages in the opposite direction. Rather than evaluate and compare, I need to form the habit of just processing, limiting retention, and allowing the force of time to do it’s thing.

It’s always easy to say you’ll do something, but taking action is what’s difficult. To combat the urge of putting something off, or simply saying “I’ll do it later, or I’ll start tomorrow” I created an artboard through Adobe Illustrator to visualize all the days I’ve lived, as well as an estimate of the days I have left based on the median life expectancy in the United States for a male. I have been on this planet for a total of 10,788 days. In 19,212 days, I’ll hit my 82nd birthday. I went to https://imrodmartin.com/my-days to quickly punch in my birthday to get my exact number. When you see it presented, you quickly realize that our time is short. Try this out and see if this sparks any change or realizations about your own life.


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